Broadsides from 48th Street Press

48thstreetpressI’m happy to report that two poems of mine were just released as broadsides by 48th Street Press.

Each year, 48th Street Press puts out a small number of poetry broadsides — poems printed in limited edition on fancypants card-stock paper. I have two broadsides available: “Going dark” and “I saw you.” Only twenty copies of each exist in the world.

If you’re local (to me), let me know if you’d like a copy and we’ll figure something out. If you’re not local, you can order a set of them from me for two bucks, shipping included, via PayPal. I have signed and hand-numbered these bad boys, by the way.

Two signed, numbered poetry broadsides
by Matt Galletta
Published by 48th Street Press
$2




Other contributors to the broadside series this year include favorites of mine like Wolfgang Carstens, Lawrence Gladeview, (fellow Albany poet) Alan Catlin, Kevin Ridgeway, Ben John Smith, John Yamrus…the list goes on! You’ll have to seek out these other writers yourself to get copies of theirs. Which I highly recommend you do. After you send me two bucks, that is.

 

Discover Your Inner Philly Cheesesteak By Taking Our 12 Question Test

cheesesteakThought I’d try doing misleading, Buzzfeed-style headings again. How’s this one?

Anyway, a poem called “You Remind Me of Philadelphia,” about a stolen car stereo, is up at Headlock Press as of this weekend. It was first printed in Lummox a couple years ago, though it’s a little different now, I think.

Stay tuned for a few new things coming out early 2016.

Mixed bag at Headlock Press

A couple pieces I wrote went up at Headlock Press this week.

You can take a look at a story/prose poem thing I wrote around five million years ago. I had originally called it “Detective Story” but then a (now-defunct) online mag published it with the new title of “A Metaphor.” Fast-forward a few years, I show it to Paul Agostino, editor at HP, and he rechristens it “Creating Conflict.” I’m eager to see who renames it next.

That one’s followed by “Must be nice,” a poem from a while back.

The whole thing starts off with an excerpt from an email I sent to Paul recently. It includes my response to his new book, Appalachian Calculations. I see now how what I wrote reads almost like a book review, and you can take it as such. The book is non-fiction, a collection of short essays and anecdotes about Paul’s travels through small-town mountain country in North Carolina. Spoiler alert: It’s a good book, and worth the fifteen bucks it’ll cost you to get a copy.

This One Dad Arranged A Couple Dozen Words In Funny Lines And Called It A Poem, What Happens Next Is Crazy

Continuing the dumb Buzzfeed-style headlines. I’m enjoying myself, at least.

A very short new poem called “Let me hold on to this” went up on Red Fez just yesterday. It’s part of issue #78 for Red Fez, and I’m sharing space with some great folks like fellow Epic Rites Press author Zarina Zabrisky.

This isn’t the first time I’ve been in Red Fez: Check my “profile” which has links to the other stuff of mine that the Fez has published.

You Won’t Believe What Helen Keller And The 52-Hz Whale Do In This Video

whaleGonna try doing misleading Buzzfeed-style headlines like the above from now on. Enjoy that.

Anyway, I have a short story titled “Helen Keller in Reverse” in The Lonely Whale Memoir: An Anthology, which just came out from Chatsworth Press. My story is not about whales. Most of the book isn’t about whales. Instead, here’s what the jacket copy says:

Since 1989, the world has been following the heartbreaking journey of the Lonely Whale. For reasons unknown, he or she cannot speak the same language as other whales. Referred to by some as the 52-Hz Whale—because of its unique frequency of whale song—the Lonely Whale has been tracked roaming the oceans alone, listening in vain for a song that will never be returned.

The Lonely Whale Memoir gives voice to the unheard song within all of us, capturing themes and feelings sparked by the actual Lonely Whale. Through compelling stories and passionate poetry we will swim past the isolation that normally separates us and, for a moment, truly connect.

I just finished reading my copy of the book last night, and I highly recommend it. A lot of great stories and poems in there; among them, there’s one called “Neighborhood Watch” by a Courtney Bird that’s worth the price of admission alone, I think.

Looks like you can purchase a copy from Amazon, or straight from the publisher. Get your whale on.